The Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra Presents: Music at the Millennium, FREE Summer Concert Series

Join us on Tuesday, June 13, 2017, and every Tuesday thereafter until August 15 for Music at the Millennium, free summer concert series, that brings world-class musicians from the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra out to perform, free of charge, in the former banking hall (Celebration Hall), at the historic Millennium Centre (the former Canadian Bank of Commerce) located at 389 Main Street, between Lombard and McDermot on the East side of Main Street.

Sandwiches and drinks will be available for purchase by WOW Hospitality Concepts, and donations to the Millennium Centre, (a charitable, non-profit organization), will be gratefully accepted. 

When: Every Tuesday from June 13th, 2017 to August 15th, 2017 between 12 pm & 1 pm.
Doors Open at 11:30 am and the Concert starts at promptly at noon. 

Thank you to TELPAY for sponsorsing this event. TELPAY
Also to WOW Hospitality, tenants and exclusive caters at the Millennium Centre, AND themillenniumcentre for their gracious contributions. 



 

Where: The Millennium Centre, 389 Main Street (east side of Main Street between Lombard and McDermot)



Frontlines: Exhibit A - Investigating the Public Safety Building & Lands

Thank you to everyone who came out to listen to the presentations and panel discussion regarding this important initiative.  Special thanks to Storefront Manitoba and CentreVenture Development Corporation for faciliating this event.
This was session 1 of 3  of the Storefront Manitoba Frontlines series.  Heritage Winnipeg participated in the panel discussion to investigate future options for the Public Safety Building and Market Lands. For further details visit:

Storefront Manitoba

CentreVenture Development Corporation




Crocus Building renamed the McKim Building

Heritage Winnipeg is very pleased to announce the Crocus building, located at 211 Bannatyne Avenue, in the Exchange District, a national historic site, (formerly named the J.H. Ashdown Hardware Store) is now officially called The McKim Building, named for McKim Communications Group - www.mckimcg.ca.  For years many Winnipeggers have been waiting patiently for this historic building to be renamed.  A brand new sign is now shining high above the sidewalk on the Main Street facade. Congratulations!


McKim Communications Group Media Release - dated January 11, 2017:
McKimBldgRenaming

Links to media coverage:
CBC News
Winnipeg Sun

City of Winnipeg historical report
 

"Explore the Exchange" Membership Drive!

Have you heard? Thanks to the generosity of our donors, there will be one more draw on Sept. 30, 2014! Renew your membership to be entered for one more prize!

Congratulations
to our July winner, member Kerry Dangerfield!
Congratulations to our August winner, member Aengus Bridgman!
Congratulations to our September winner, Gary Hawthorne!

Thank you to Architecture49 Inc. and the historic Bank of Montreal for taking out a new corporate memberships with Heritage Winnipeg as part of our Explore the Exchange membership drive!

Memberships can be paid by cash, cheque, or credit card.
http://heritagewinnipeg.com/store

Check out our donor websites:
www.avedainstitute.ca/Winnipeg/salon
www.faceboook.com/ExchangeUporium
www.fleetgalleries.com
www.foxandfiddle.com/winnipeg
www.centennialconcerthall.com
www.mariaggis.com
www.wowhospitality.ca/restaurants/peasantcookery.html
www.waterfrontmassage.ca






 

The Scott Block - 272 Main Street

History is not on their side (Winnipeg Free Press, July 23, 2014)
Advocacy Alert: The Scott Block at 272 Main Street (Heritage Winnipeg Blog, July 23, 2014)
HW's Annual Preservation Awards (Heritage Winnipeg, February 17, 2014)

Millennium Centre

Formerly known as The Canadian Bank of Commerce Building, The Millennium Centre, located at 389 Main Street, officially opened in June 2002.
  
               THEN (1903)                             NOW (2004)

The Canadian Bank of Commerce first opened their offices in Winnipeg in 1889. Designed by architects Darling and Pearson, the 1889 building was torn down and moved to another CIBC bank location in Regina in 1906. The current building occupying 389 Main Street (a similar but larger version of the former structure that was transferred) was designed by the same architects along with the help of Winnipeg's own Charles H. Wheeler. It officially opened in October 1912 and served as the site of the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce until 1969. The building was vacated that year and remained so for approximately 30 years.

The Bank of Commerce is a significant piece of Winnipeg banking history, and in 1970, the Winnipeg City Council fought to prevent the destruction of this important landmark. For its protection, the building was subsequently given a Grade I Heritage Building status in 1979 by the City of Winnipeg. In 1999, a group of volunteers came together as the Winnipeg Millennium Council and initiated a project to restore, preserve, and revitalize the building. In 2000, the Marwest Group of Companies donated the building to the 389 Main Street Heritage Corporation, a non-profit corporation and charity. Forming a partnership with the 389 Main Street Heritage Corporation in 2002, Storm Catering would use the main floor banking hall to host special events and welcome the public back into the building.

While the main floor and basement are in use, the five upper floors remain vacant, and the Board of the 389 Main Street Heritage Corporation hopes to restore the entire building. Steps have been taken to develop a model and plan for utilizing the entire building. Having partnered with Artspace Inc. to generate a potential model, the Corporation envisions a fully restored building featuring art galleries and museums on the upper floors, while the main floor will serve as an information and resource centre. Any updates regarding the Millennium Centre will be posted on this page.  

The Millennium Centre was awarded the 'Best Architecture' for our 2013 Doors Open Winnipeg Event. Click here to see all of 2013's Doors Open Winnipeg award recipients.


MONEY TALKS: Tales from Bankersí Row

Greg Agnew from Heritage Winnipeg presented a visual presentation of Winnipeg’s “Bankers’ Row” at noon on December 5, in the Carol Shields Auditorium at the Millennium Library.

 

By the turn of the century, between City Hall and Portage and Main there existed over 20 banks and financial institutions. Greg dressed in period costume and entertained his audience with tall tales of this vibrant historic area.

 

 

Thank you Greg for a great presentation and to the Millennium Library!




Shanghai Restaurant

The Shanghai Restaurant Building (originally the Robert Block and later the Coronation Block) was built in 1883 as a mixed-use development with commercial space at grade and offices and residential suites above. The stone and Brick structure occupies the full city block on King Street between Alexander Avenue and Pacific Avenue. From 1883-86 the mayor and city hall occupied the main floor while the “gingerbread” city hall building was being constructed. The Shanghai Restaurant took residence in the main level in the 1940’s.

The Historical Buildings Committee recommended that the building be placed on the Heritage Conservation List as a Grade III heritage structure based solely on its age, architectural and historical significance.

City council’s Executive Committee disregarded HBC’s recommendation due to the 128-year-old building’s “questionable long term economic viability” and voted unanimously to demolish. The demolition permit will be issued when Chinatown Development Corporation has prepared a firm redevelopment proposal –for the proposed senior’s assisted living complex- and has made a formal application for a building permit. CDC’s plan to demolish the building for a revenue generating parking lot has been denied.

Through 40 years of neglect the second floor has been destroyed from severe water damage due to lack of heat and roof failure.

The building has been deemed structurally unsound and economically unviable to repair by Ray Wan –architect working on the CDC’s development - despite no official documentation or engineering report and disputation by the HBC.

The CDC has been questioned on why they have chosen this specific location for their project as it is surrounded by vacant land. The loss of this restaurant is seen by many to be a blow to the neighborhood and downtown.

Here are some of the latest stories in the free press:

Saving Heritage, Block by Block
Diners Crowd in to say Goodbye to the Shanghai
Heart of Chinatown Tossed aside
A Bittersweet ending.



Grain Exchange Building Annex



The Grain Exchange Building at 167 Lombard Avenue was completed in 1907 and primarily leased to agriculture-related businesses. During the 1920’s Canada’s reputation as being a major producer and exporter of grain grew. Major additions to the building in 1913, 1914, 1916, 1922, and 1928 were needed to accommodate the tenants’ needs due to the growth of the trade. Throughout the first two decades of its existence, it remained one of the largest office towers in the British Empire.

The Grain Exchange Building Annex was constructed just east of the building to create additional office space for agriculture-related businesses in 1920. It is seen as an important transitional design, a modern translation of the historic architectural language of the neighboring Grain Exchange Building. It combines classically based ornamentation of the early 20th style architecture with minimalist and grid like arrangements of modernist architecture.

In 1992, the Grain Exchange Building was placed on the Buildings Conservation List as a grade II at the request of the owners. MarWest Group of companies (the owners) have put over $13 million into the restoration of the Building and it continues to operate at over 90% occupancy.

As of December 30th 2007 the Annex had been sitting vacant for three years, blocking access of loading and fire trucks to the Grain Exchange Building. There is no basement or insulation resulting in the annex to be heated and cooled by the building. The owners wanted to redevelop the parking lot of the adjacent site along with the Annex into a Parkade with street level retail Since it is connected to the Grain Exchange Building via an overpass, it is considered part of the building, which made it designated grade II on the Building Conservation List (BCL) as well.

A formal application letter from the owners of the buildings to the city clerk was sent December 30th 2007 for a change of designation of the entire Grain Exchange Building from a grade II to grade III listing. The application was later rescinded and an application was sent for the Annex to be placed on the inventory to be evaluated as a separate building so as to retain the Grade II designation of the more significant building. The owners inquired into the removal of the Annex from the BCL in order to develop the site.

On January 12th 2009 the owners notified the Planning, Property and Development Department that they had a parkade proposal for the annex site and wished to reapply for a demo permit.

Currently they have 122 stalls but the parkade would allow for a minimum of 275 stalls to exist and allow the building to remain viable.They believe that the proposed parkade will contribute to the ongoing vitality of the Exchange District National Historic Site. They are planning on finishing the development with a historic façade that will positively contribute to the streetscape. The owners have been encouraged by the Winnipeg Parking Authority and the Forks North Portage Partnership to build the parking structure to meet the demands of the downtown parking created by the growth of waterfront drive and the future Human Rights Museum. The structure would be able to access the skywalk system through the Grain Exchange Building is created on the site of the annex.

On January 16th 2009, The Historical Buildings Committee (HBC) recommended that the Grain Exchange Building Annex be placed on the BCL as a grade III with the following character defining elements:

  • South facing office building located at Lombard, adjoining its parent Grain Exchange Building to the west via a second floor bridge.
  • Simple elongated rectangular plan.
  • South elevation with smoothly dressed limestone base with buff brick walls.
  • Ample and grid-like arrangement of fenestration on the east façade.
  • West, east, and north elevations with simple clay brick and modest detailing.[i]

On May 19th 2009, the Lord Selkirk – West Kildonan Community Committee disagreed with the HBC’s recommendation of placing the Annex on the (BCL) as a grade III listing.

On July 13th 2009 the Standing Policy Committee (SPC) on Property and Development (P&D) concurred in the recommendation of the Lord Selkirk – West Kildonan Community Committee with the following amendments namely:

  • Grain exchange building annex at 153 Lombard Avenue not be placed on the BCL as a grade III.
  • That no demo permits be issued for 153 Lombard Avenue prior to the issuance of building permits.
  • That the construction of the proposed development shall be in conformance with the renderings submitted to the SPL on P&D.
  • That the proper officers of the city be authorized to do all things necessary to implement the intent of the foregoing.[ii]

Ray Wan of Ray Wan Architects Inc. submitted two computer-generated images of the proposed development.

On July 15th 2009, the Executive Policy Committee (EPC) agreed with the SPC of P&D and the Lord Selkirk-West Kildonan CC to not add the Annex to the BCL.

On July 22nd 2009, City Council voted 9-6 in opposition of adding the Annex to the BCL, concurring with the EPC, the SPC on P&D and the Lord Selkirk – West Kildonan CC. Council adopted the SPC’s recommendations.



[i]Council Minutes on the Standing Policy Committee Report on Property and Development (July 13th)
[ii]
Council Minutes on the Standing Policy Committee Report on Property and Development (July 13th)
 


Sport Manitoba



In 1882, James Robertson and Co. commissioned a warehouse on the north side of Pacific Ave. between Main and Martha streets. In 1884 Robertson and his company’s local manager commissioned English immigrant and prominent Architect Charles H. Wheeler to design another building further east on Alexander. Wheeler hired Thomas Kelly as the contractor. Robertson leased the building to George Duncan Wood and Company.

George Duncan Wood relocated prior to 1900 and John Dyck Ltd. moved in.

The SmartBag company of Montreal bought John Dyck out in 1906, purchased the property from James Robertson and proceeded to hire Daniel Smith to design the second section of the building. In 1913 the SmartBag Co. merged with Woods Manufacturing Co. and became Smart-Woods Ltd. Due to the mergence of the two respected businesses, more room was needed and the third section was commissioned through John Woodman and Raymond Carey Architects. Many other tenants have resided in the SmartBag Co. building (as it is most commonly known) throughout the years. Prosperity Knitwear was the owner prior to its purchase by Sport Manitoba.

Section A was originally built as a two-storey structure using the mill construction method (solid brick walls, square timber beams and post interior support system and wooden plank floors). A third floor was added prior to 1900. The same method of construction was used on Section B in 1906. The largest and final section was built using reinforced concrete, the latest in technology at the time. This 5-storey building’s facades face three prominent thoroughfares (Lily St., Alexander Ave. and Pacific Ave.) and as a result the building is seen as defining those intersections and being an important contribution to the historic streetscapes.

Due to its three-decade construction period, the complex has ties to three important periods in Winnipeg’s growth including the real estate boom of the early 1880’s, the turn of the century growth phase and the period prior to the First World War when the city was at its growth pinnacle.

The oldest portion of the complex was one of the 22 oldest buildings in the Downtown and one of the eight oldest warehouses. It was seen as a rare, handsome and one of the most intact early examples of the Romanesque Revival Style.[i] The characteristics of the Romanesque Revival Style are:

  • solid brick with a raised stone basement

  • rusticated stone accenting around windows and doors and at roof level

  • use of the arch above the windows and doors

The larger building was built in 1913 and is a simpler, more modern rendition of the Romanesque Revival style with a limestone base, arched windows and brick exterior walls with stone accenting around windows and doors.

The Historical Buildings Committee recommended that the building be listed as a Grade II on December 11 2008. Along with Heritage Winnipeg, the HBC wanted a designation of grade II for “a more vigorous form of protection that is difficult to repeal” but decided to “support the less restrictive heritage designation to allow Sport Manitoba to amend its plans for the athletic centre, which could fill a recreational void in the inner city” [ii]

On January 6th 2009, The SmartBag Company Building was placed on the HBC Conservation list as a grade III building. Including the character-defining elements:

Section A and B (built 1884 and 1906)
                     Exterior
                 o     
3 masonry walls (North, South and West) of the north facing structure
                 o     
metal decorative cornice of the main façade
                 o     
paired and arched second and third stody windows with continuous stone sllls and brick accenting
                 o     
other main façade details including pilasters with decorative metal caps and decorative brick panels
                 o     
railway track lintels on the ground floor windows and the original windows on the third floor of the west façade
                   
              Interior

                 o     
Structural elements (wood beams and posts) and wood 2nd and 3rd floors

             Section C (built 1913) (all elements pertain to north, south and east elevation
             Exterior

                  o     
Reinforced concrete facade
                  o     
Rusticated stone-clad base and dark brick upper floor cladding with stone accenting
                  o     
Stone belt course above the forth floor windows and the stone capping
                  o     
Original industrial sash windwons on all levels including raised, square-headed basement opening, large ground floor elements and arched fourth floor windows with stone keystones
                  o     
Main entrances (two on north and one on south) featuring bull’s eye windows above doors recessed in rusticated and smooth-cut ashlar, prominent surround and keystones
                  o     
Deeply recessed square-headed loading bays on the south façade
                    
            
Interior
                  o     
Columns with mushroom capitals at all levels.[iii]

 

In June 2009, the HBC approved the first phase of the rehabilitation to section C and approved the partial demolition of section A and B to make room for the field house on the condition that the northern façade be retained and integrated into the new development.[iv]

On October 15th 2009, “an independent Engineer’s report deemed [the entire structure including the north façade] structurally unsound”. “After significant deliberation and consideration of various options the HBC amended the existing Certificate of Suitability to appove-in-principle the complete demolition of [the 3 story building] upon submission of the development proposal”[v] and on condition that the site would not be used as surface parking while vacant.

On February 2nd 2010, issued a statement that “they hope[d] to move forward with plans to build a $15-million field house on [the site of] a three-storey component of the Smart Bag building”[vi].

Due to the designation as grade III rather than the recommended grade II, a partial demolition was allowed. The Fire Department considered all three sections as one building therefore the demolition was seen only as a partial and under grade III designation was not required to go to Property and Development. Sport Manitoba was given approval to demolish sections A and B no longer needing to retain the more ornamentally complex north façade as was part of the previous compromise.

Feb 18th 2010 HBC supported the demolition based on proof of significant structural compromise to the structure, thorough review alternatives, and support demonstrated for the proposed interim/future use of the site by the applicant”. The proposed second phase of the renovations is building a multimillion-dollar field house that includes educational, therapeutic and recreational components in the location of the original two sections of the building.

June 2010 sections A and B were demolished. Construction of the field house is in the beginning stages.


[i] Heritage Planners Report December 2008

[ii] (2009, January 7. Kives, B. Sport Manitoba to revisit inner-city field house plan. Winnipeg Free Press).

[iii] Council Minutes Jan 28th 2009, City Clerks Department

[iv] City of Winnipeg Briefing note. February 19, 2010. (1)

[v]City of Winnipeg Briefing note. February 19, 2010. (1)

[vi] 2010, February 2. Kives, B. Sport Manitoba revisits field house. Winnipeg Free Press

 

December 2008. 145 Pacific Avenue SmartBag Company (George Duncan Wood and Co. Building). City of Winnipeg Historical Buildings Committee Report.



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