Dalnavert Museum - 61 Carlton Street

UPDATE NOVEMBER 28, 2014

Study to probe reopening Dalnavert Museum (Winnipeg Free Press November 23, 2014)

UPDATE NOVEMBER 7, 2014

Heritage Winnipeg Blog Post about the history of Dalnavert
TOWN HALL MEETING NOV. 22, 2014 - see you there!
 

UPDATE MAY 30, 2014

Dalnavert's Backers Upbeat (Winnipeg Free Press May 25, 2014)
Dalnavert Meeting to Be Held Today Despite Pullout by Candace House (Winnipeg Free Press May 23, 2014)
Candace House withdraws proposal for Dalnavert Museum (Winnipeg Free Press May 23, 2014)
Museum's Future Goes to Vote (Winnipeg Free Press May 23, 2014)
 

UPDATE MAY 6, 2014 - FRIENDS OF DALNAVERT

Friends of Dalnavert Museum Proposal
 
UPDATE MAY 5, 2014

Museums want Dalnavert's Share (Winnipeg Free Press May 1, 2014)
Candace House in tradition of Dalnavert (Winnipeg Free Press April 30, 2014)
Dalnavert - Candace House partnership sound (Winnipeg Free Press April 30, 2014)

 
UPDATE APRIL 23, 2014

"The Friends of Dalnavert say they can recruit the experts needed to keep Dalnavert a viable attraction rather than see its owner, the Manitoba Historical Society, turn over the keys to Candace House, a centre for victims of crime who have to attend to or testify at the Law Courts Building or in provincial court."

Still Hope For Dalnavert: Friends (Winnipeg Free Press)

 
UPDATE APRIL 17, 2014

"The Manitoba Historical Society has agreed to transfer Dalnavert Museum to Candace House Inc., a non-profit support centre for the victims of crime." (taken from "Dalnavert To Reopen as Support Centre", Winnipeg Free Press)

To read the full article, please click the link below:

Dalnavert To Reopen as Support Centre (Winnipeg Free Press)

 

A NATIONAL HISTORIC TREASURE - DALNAVERT MUSEUM

Sir Hugh John Macdonald, son of John A. Macdonald (Canada's first prime minister), purchased the property at 61 Carlton Street, where a home for his family was to be built and named Dalnavert. Constructed in 1895, the Dalnavert House reflects Victorian-era architectural style. Lady MacDonald sold Dalnavert after Sir Hugh John Macdonald died in 1929, and it became a boarding house until it was purchased almost 40 years later by Lakeview Developments Company. Their intention was to tear down the house and build an apartment building in its place, at which point, the Manitoba Historical Society stepped in and raised enough money to purchase the home from the company so as to preserve the home's legacy. In 1974, the Dalnavert was restored and re-opened as a museum with guided tours. In September 30, 1987, Dalnavert became a provincially designated site and became a National Historic Site in 1990. For more historic information on Dalnavert, please click here

After a surprise closure following Labor Day in September 2013, the fate of the historic Dalnavert Museum has yet to be determined. This sudden closure frustrated many of the volunteers who came to work one day only to find the doors locked without any advanced notice. Low attendance rates in conjunction with the cost to keep the museum running played a big role in the decision to close its doors. The Manitoba Historical Society has been spending these past winter months deliberating on and trying to reach an acceptable solution on how to proceed regarding this important Winnipeg landmark. For more information regarding the closing of Dalnavert, please read the following Winnipeg Free Press articles:


Historic Dalnavert Shuttered
Heritage Community Seeks to Save Dalnavert
Dalnavert Museum's Glimmer of Hope

Heritage Winnipeg along with other stakeholders have formed the Friends of Dalnavert Museum and responded to a recent request for proposals from The Manitoba Historical Society.  We are currently working to move forward to look at all options to re-open this historic and unique museum.  2014 marks the 40th anniversary of the opening of Dalnavert Museum. 

Voice Your Support! Federal Incentives for the Rehabilitation of Canada's Historic Places

Update March 17 – House of Commons to vote on Bill C-323 on Thursday, March 23. Vote will either kill Bill or send it to the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development for further discussion. It’s not too late to contact your local MP!

Update March 2 – Second hour of House of Commons debate on Heritage Tax Bill C-323 may be set for Thursday, March 9. Vote to kill bill or to send committee – March 22.

Update Feb. 13 – First hour of debate on Heritage Tax Bill C-323 took place in House of Commons

On December 1, 2016, a Private Members Bill to create tax credits for historic places was tabled in the House of Commons. Bill C-323 – An Act to Amend the Income Tax Act (Rehabilitation of Historic Property) – is based on a great US success story with a 40- year track record. This Bill presents an historic opportunity to tell elected officials from every political party that Canada’s historic places matter, and that federal actions can help save and renew them.
 
About Bill C-323
 
Bill C-323 includes the creation of:
 
  • A 20% tax credit on eligible costs of rehabilitation work done to designated historic places (commercial & owner-occupied residential); and
  • An accelerated Capital Cost Allowance (25%/50%/25%) for eligible capitalized costs incurred under the same conditions of the tax credit (commercial only)
 
These two tax measures would transform the economic fundamentals for renewing historic places. In the process would create more skilled jobs and generate less carbon and new construction.

 
What can you do?
 
You’ll find information about Bill C-323 and background materials to help you take action below.
 
1. Write to your MP, or ask for a meeting, or both! Point to historic places in your riding that need this kind of financial measure – especially those at risk!
 
Here is a link to find your MP by postal code: https://goo.gl/Yt9R9q
 
2. Write a letter to the Minister of the Environment, who is responsible for built heritage in Canada.  A real letter is much more effective than an e-mail!

The Honourable Catherine McKenna MP
Minister of Environment and Climate Change
200 Sacre-Coeur Boulevard
Gatineau QC K1A 0H3

http://ec.ministre-minister.ec@canada.ca

If you would like to learn more about the proposed measure please do not hesitate to contact us at our Heritage Winnipeg offices:

Office: 204-942-2663
Email: http://info@heritagewinnipeg.com

Full text of Bill C-323:

https://goo.gl/nkQQMy

National Trust for Canada Webpage:
https://goo.gl/nuyX06








 




 
 
 
 
 
 

Frontlines: Exhibit A - Investigating the Public Safety Building & Lands

Thank you to everyone who came out to listen to the presentations and panel discussion regarding this important initiative.  Special thanks to Storefront Manitoba and CentreVenture Development Corporation for faciliating this event.
This was session 1 of 3  of the Storefront Manitoba Frontlines series.  Heritage Winnipeg participated in the panel discussion to investigate future options for the Public Safety Building and Market Lands. For further details visit:

Storefront Manitoba

CentreVenture Development Corporation




Save 514 Wellington Crescent!

This historic and stunning home has stood on the corner of Wellington Crescent and Kingsway, adjacent to St. Mary’s Academy since 1909. The home’s official name is the Gordon residence, named for its first owner James T. Gordon,  who worked in the meat packing business. It is a beautifully built home, and Winnipeg will likely never see the likes of it again if it is demolished.



It not only has great architectural value, but a rich social history, with many prominent families calling it home over the years. During the 1920s the Bawlf family, who founded the Grain Exchange owned the home, and the Grain Exchange had a huge impact on the development of Winnipeg as a City.  During the 1940s, Victor Sifton, the owner and publisher of the Winnipeg Free Press, lived in this home and until earlier this year, the home was owned by former Senator Douglas Everett who maintained it meticulously. Currently Leader Equity Partners, a Winnipeg development firm, have purchased the 107-year-old, 8,000-square-foot home, and potentially want to demolish it to build a new condo development on the property.  

Along with Heritage Winnipeg many people in the heritage community are outraged, and many of the residents of the Crescentwood Association are rallying to help save the home. Visit save514wellington.com for more information, and click here to add your name to the petition to help save this beautiful historic home.

Dennistoun House - 166 Roslyn Road



UPDATE:
Century-old Osborne Village home could be bulldozed for development (CTV News September 15, 2015)
End of the line looms for historic Dennistoun House (Winnipeg Free Press September 8, 2015)
"Residents wishing to ask questions or register objections can attend the meeting at 6pm at City Hall on Sept. 16"

 


Robert Maxwell Dennistoun was a specialist in corporate law and came to Winnipeg in 1907 to represent several influential corporations. He drew up Manitoba’s first workman’s compensation act. In addition to a respected career as a lawyer and judge, Dennistoun kept a parallel military career.

The Honorable Robert Maxwell Dennistoun commissioned prominent architect John Atchinson to design a house for his family in 1908 at 166 Roslyn Road in the Osborne Village area of Winnipeg. Atchinson had designed a large number of prominent Winnipeg buildings by that time. He designed Dennistoun house in Tudor style, commonly used for upper-class residences between 1890 and 1940 in North America.

Distinguishing features of the Tudor style are:

  • Steep-pitched roof on cross gable
  • Decorative half timbering with an infill of stucco
  • Portions of the walls finished in brick veneer
  • Elaborate gothic arched entranceway with quoins of stone
  • Doors and side transoms are glazed with leaded glass in small panes

Winnipeg declared Dennistoun House a grade 3 historic building on its Buildings Conservation List in 1984 due to its architectural significance and integrity. It was also placed on the list based on the historical interest surrounding the man who erected it and its importance of the surrounding area, which during the early 1900’s became the district of stately banker’s homes.

In 1977 the house was bought and converted into a five-unit rental property.

When this owner passed in 2006 the heirs decided they were no longer operating this building as a rental property. A development team on behalf of the owners applied to the city for the delisting of the Dennistoun House.

The City’s Historical Buildings Committee inspected Dennistoun House and concluded it was a good example of the Tudor style designed by Mr. Atchinson and the heritage values of the house had not changed since its listing in 1984. The HBC recommended the Dennistoun House not be delisted.

On June 2 2009, “the Standing Committee did not concur with the recommendation of the HBC and recommended instead that Dennistoun House be removed from the Building Conservation List; that no demolition permits be issued before building permits are issued; and that City officials be authorized to implement the intent of this recommendation”.

The city’s Executive Policy Committee agreed with the Standing Committee.

The matter went to Council on June 24 2009. Council was given all materials generated or considered for the application to delist including:

-       HBC’s March 20 2009 letter

-       Report dated October 9, 1984

-       The Standing Policy Committee and Executive Policy Committee minutes of meetings

-       Any presentations given to these committee’s

-       Developer’s report that included City’s Planning Property and Development department’s response, a letter from an architect regarding the feasibility of integrating Dennistoun House into the Development and newspaper reports

-       Written submissions and petition from a number of citizens

-       Delegations for and against the recommendation also addressed City Council in person including Ms. Lukovich of Osborne Village Neighborhood Association and the Executive Director of Heritage Winnipeg who were against the recommendation

City Council was made aware of the “impact its decision may have on the neighborhood, and from a policy or precedent standpoint” as well as the Osborne Village Plan.

City Council decided by a majority vote to concur with the recommendation made by the Standing Policy Committee and agreed to by the Executive Policy Committee, to remove Dennistoun House from the Buildings Conservation List. This decision enables the historic homes potential for demolition and replacement with a condominium complex.

Members of the Osborne Village Neighborhood Association with the support of Heritage Winnipeg sought a judicial review for an order to quash the decision made by city council.

A strong argument was made in regards to the heritage element of the Osborne Village Plan on demolition of historic buildings:

7.1.6.A             Discourage the demolition of historic or architecturally significant buildings or structures. Demolition shall be considered as a last resort, and should only be considered when buildings are determined to be structurally unsound beyond repair by an independent structural engineering report. Economic viability should not be the sole determining factor;

7.1.6.B            Prior to consideration of a proposal for the demolition of a historic building or structure, a formal independent consultant’s report on the physical condition and economic viability of retaining the building should be prepared for review by the City. The consultant’s report is to be carried out at the expense of the applicant.

In July 2010 The Judge found that the “requirements of section 7.1.6 of the Osborne Village Plan were not mandatory but rather permissive and intended to be subjectively assessed by City Council” in making their opinion. He also found City Councils decision to delist to be “consistent” with both Plan Winnipeg and the Osborne Village Plan. Furthermore he found that City Council acted within its jurisdiction in removing Dennistoun House from the list and dismissed the application.

For further information on either the Judge’s decision or the Historical Report please click on the links below.

Sources:

The Judge’s decision July 2010

Historical Buildings Committee Report October 9, 1984

           



Upper Fort Garry

UPDATE:
Friends of Fort Garry appealing denial of short-term parking lot (Winnipeg Free Press May 4, 2015)
Temporary lot for Upper Fort Garry project denied (CTV News May 4, 2015)
Still seeking parking lot for park (Winnipeg Free Press May 5, 2015)
Committee allows Friends of Upper Fort Garry interim parking lot to raise funds (Winnipeg Free Press May 25, 2015)
 
UPDATE:
Friends of Upper Fort Garry say park's primary significiance is the Metis (Winnipeg Free Press October 17, 2014)
Scots slam perceived snub (Winnipeg Free Press, October 17, 2014)
Upper Fort Garry site a provincial park (Winnipeg Free Press, July 16, 2014)
Province Announces Proclamation to Help Develop Park at Upper Fort Garry (Province of Manitoba, July 15, 2014)
Upper Fort Garry park, birthplace of Winnipeg, opens in September (CBC News, July 15, 2014)

Upper Fort Garry is the place where Winnipeg and Manitoba was born and the site of significant historic events. Exciting plans are underway to reclaim and transform this treasure into a $19 million world class heritage park and interpretive centre.
The Friends of Upper Fort Garry are working on the preservation of the original location of Upper Fort Garry, located along Main Street and spanning from Broadway to Assiniboine Avenue. Through the building of Upper Fort Garry Heritage Park and Interpretive Centre, the Friends of Upper Fort Garry aim to generate interest in the history of Winnipeg, MB and Canada and to preserve a historic landmark. Highlights of this unique park include:
  • a design that demarcates the foundations of the original buildings and walls

  • the original Governor’s Gate

  • interpretive and symbolic representations of the fort and the buildings that were once enclosed within its walls

  • installations of art and other creative works within the park will represent the rich history of Upper Fort Garry

  • outdoor gathering spaces for historical events and programs

  • a modern Interpretive Centre that houses meeting facilities and exhibitions.

For more information and updates on the Park's progress, please visit the Friends of Upper Fort Garry Website here



Unveiling of Upper Fort Garry Provincial Park and Recognition Wall


 
The Friends of Upper Fort Garry invite you and your guests to the unveiling of Upper Fort Garry Provincial Park and Recognition Wall.

Date: October 18, 2014
11:00am-11:15am - Recognition Wall Unveiling
11:20am-12:00pm (noon) - Park Ceremony
12:00pm-3:00pm - Explore Upper Fort Garry Provincial Park: Learn about the site's history and what is yet to come!
Enjoy the entertainment
Dress: Casual (flat shoes recommended)

Be sure to check out the Heritage Winnipeg Blog post about Upper Fort Garry for some background information before the event!

Check out the mobile site at ufg.patternhosting.com for a unique self-guided tour, usable on your laptop or smartphone!

The Scott Block - 272 Main Street

History is not on their side (Winnipeg Free Press, July 23, 2014)
Advocacy Alert: The Scott Block at 272 Main Street (Heritage Winnipeg Blog, July 23, 2014)
HW's Annual Preservation Awards (Heritage Winnipeg, February 17, 2014)

Historical Resources Bylaw

Winnipeg Considers Creating Heritage District (Winnipeg Sun, June 10, 2014)
A Future For Heritage Conservation (Winnipeg Free Press, June 10, 2014)
May 5 Standing Policy Committee on Downtown Development, Heritage, and Riverbank Management Agenda (City Clerks)
Historic Resources By-law Reports (City Clerks)
Heirtage-structures bylaw gets upgrade (Winnipeg Free Press)
Heritage Winnipeg praises bylaw for historic buildings (Metro News)
 

Sherbrook Pool

Update March 12, 2014 Sherbrook Pool is expected to be reopened in 2015. Congratulations to the Kinsman Club of Winnipeg for their generous donation to help re-open this historic and very valuable community asset. Community partnerships work!

A Swimmingly Good Time Will Be Had (Winnipeg Free Press)
 
 

 
Located at 381 Sherbrook Street, Sherbrook Pool officially opened in 1931 amidst The Great Depression and helped provide an escape from the troubles Canadians and Winnipegers faced at the time. Since it was the first Olympic-size pool in Winnipeg, it also served as both a training facility and a competition venue. The architecture of the building features an Art Deco style, designed by Ralph Benjamin Pratt and Donald Aynsley Ross.

For more background information on this historical facility, please consult the following documents published by the City of Winnipeg Historical Buildings Committee in 2001.

381 Sherbrook Street (Long Version)

381 Sherbrook Street (Short Version)

In November 2012, Sherbrook Pool was closed by the City due to safety issues that arose during an inspection. Upon further assessment, it was found that the cost to repair the building and make it structurally sound would cost more than $2 million, and subsequently maintaining the pool would cost even more. Despite the high costs to fix and run the pool, the community surrounding the area is advocating for its repair as a recreation centre and prefer not to see the historic pool demolished.

UPDATE:  As of December 13, 2013, Mayor Sam Katz said the City is now committed to allocating 1.7 million to re-open the Sherbrook Pool.  The commitment comes after listening to people in the community who made the case for re-investing in the aging facility. The city said the 1.7 million will allow work to begin the pool to make it safe for public use and the pool needs an estimated 2.8 million for repairs and upgrades.
Sherbrook Pool - Gets Reprieve (Winnipeg Free Press)

For previous information on the pool's closure:

Sherbrook Pool - Gets Reprieve (Winnipeg Free Press)

Sherbrook Pool -- Worth Every Cent (Winnipeg Free Press)

Public to be consulted on fate of Sherbrook Pool (Winnipeg Free Press)

Sherbrook Pool closure worries community group (CBC News)

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