Bursary Opportunity - Youth Serves Manitoba

Youth Serves Manitoba encourages post secondary students to engage in meaningful, part-time community service with incorporated non-profit or registered charitable organizations. Upon successful completion of at least 100 hours of service, approved students will receive a $500 bursary towards tuition or student loans.

YSM operates from September 6, 2011 - April 27, 2012 for university students and from September 6, 2011 - June 15, 2012 for college students.

Student applicants must be:
 - currently attending a post secondary institution full-time (taking 60% or more of a normal year's studies in the current and subsequent school year)
 - returning to school full-time in the next academic year
 - 16 years of age or over and legally entitled to work in Canada

If interested, please contact Heritage Winnipeg.
info@heritagewinnipeg.com
(204) 942.2663


If Walls Could Talk

A documentary on Heritage Winnipeg by Brooke Clayton. Presented by MTS On Demand.

Trailer:



Coming soon to MTS Winnipeg On Demand.


First-Ever Doors Open Winnipeg Awards!

Heritage Winnipeg hosted our first annual Doors Open Awards today at the Winnipeg Free Press News Cafe in the historic Exchange District. Representatives of Doors Open sponsors announced the five award-winning buildings. Councillor Paula Havixbeck spoke on behalf of the City of Winnipeg, and local artist Jordan van Sewell unveiled the spectacular ceramic awards which he had created.

Best Restoration
Wesley Hall (University of Winnipeg)
515 Portage Avenue


Best Tour
Customs Examining Warehouse
145 McDermot Avenue


Best Overall Experience
Historical Museum of St. James
3180 Portage Avenue


The Hidden Gem
St. James the Assiniboine Anglican Church & Cemetery
525 Tylehurst


Best Architecture
Manitoba Legislative Building
450 Broadway

Thanks to all our sponsors, participants, and volunteers!


Doors Open Launch


Doors Open Winnipeg has begun!

It was officially launched at 10:30am, Wednesday May 18th, at St. Luke’s Anglican Church. Present to kick off the event were Jenny Gerbasi from the City of Winnipeg and Rev. Paul Lampman, rector of St. Luke’s, along with Cindy Tugwell of Heritage Winnipeg, Jordan van Sewell, the artist who sculpted the new Doors Open Awards, and Pam Elias who created the posters.

Jenny Gerbasi praised Winnipeggers’ commitment to preserving the city’s heritage, and she welcomed Doors Open as a contribution to that effort. “Doors Open is truly a celebration of the wonderful heritage treasures we have in our city … [it] is one of many important community based activities that serve to keep our heritage alive and well!”

Members of St. Luke’s were excited for their first year in Doors Open. Eager to show off their beautiful church, they rang the bells, played the organ and toured those in attendance through the church and up into the belltower.

Come explore the beautiful architecture and fascinating history of our city on the weekend of May 28th and 29th!
Media Launch


Boyd Building

The three storey electric sign on the side of Downtown's Boyd building has been deemed illegal by city property officials as it contravenes zoning, heritage and third - party advertising rules. A stop work order was given a year ago when the sign was first being installed.

Building owner argues about sign being taken down.
Building owner loses bid to keep sign.
Boyd Building owner appeals sign ruling.


Shanghai Restaurant

The Shanghai Restaurant Building (originally the Robert Block and later the Coronation Block) was built in 1883 as a mixed-use development with commercial space at grade and offices and residential suites above. The stone and Brick structure occupies the full city block on King Street between Alexander Avenue and Pacific Avenue. From 1883-86 the mayor and city hall occupied the main floor while the “gingerbread” city hall building was being constructed. The Shanghai Restaurant took residence in the main level in the 1940’s.

The Historical Buildings Committee recommended that the building be placed on the Heritage Conservation List as a Grade III heritage structure based solely on its age, architectural and historical significance.

City council’s Executive Committee disregarded HBC’s recommendation due to the 128-year-old building’s “questionable long term economic viability” and voted unanimously to demolish. The demolition permit will be issued when Chinatown Development Corporation has prepared a firm redevelopment proposal –for the proposed senior’s assisted living complex- and has made a formal application for a building permit. CDC’s plan to demolish the building for a revenue generating parking lot has been denied.

Through 40 years of neglect the second floor has been destroyed from severe water damage due to lack of heat and roof failure.

The building has been deemed structurally unsound and economically unviable to repair by Ray Wan –architect working on the CDC’s development - despite no official documentation or engineering report and disputation by the HBC.

The CDC has been questioned on why they have chosen this specific location for their project as it is surrounded by vacant land. The loss of this restaurant is seen by many to be a blow to the neighborhood and downtown.

Here are some of the latest stories in the free press:

Saving Heritage, Block by Block
Diners Crowd in to say Goodbye to the Shanghai
Heart of Chinatown Tossed aside
A Bittersweet ending.



Grain Exchange Building Annex



The Grain Exchange Building at 167 Lombard Avenue was completed in 1907 and primarily leased to agriculture-related businesses. During the 1920’s Canada’s reputation as being a major producer and exporter of grain grew. Major additions to the building in 1913, 1914, 1916, 1922, and 1928 were needed to accommodate the tenants’ needs due to the growth of the trade. Throughout the first two decades of its existence, it remained one of the largest office towers in the British Empire.

The Grain Exchange Building Annex was constructed just east of the building to create additional office space for agriculture-related businesses in 1920. It is seen as an important transitional design, a modern translation of the historic architectural language of the neighboring Grain Exchange Building. It combines classically based ornamentation of the early 20th style architecture with minimalist and grid like arrangements of modernist architecture.

In 1992, the Grain Exchange Building was placed on the Buildings Conservation List as a grade II at the request of the owners. MarWest Group of companies (the owners) have put over $13 million into the restoration of the Building and it continues to operate at over 90% occupancy.

As of December 30th 2007 the Annex had been sitting vacant for three years, blocking access of loading and fire trucks to the Grain Exchange Building. There is no basement or insulation resulting in the annex to be heated and cooled by the building. The owners wanted to redevelop the parking lot of the adjacent site along with the Annex into a Parkade with street level retail Since it is connected to the Grain Exchange Building via an overpass, it is considered part of the building, which made it designated grade II on the Building Conservation List (BCL) as well.

A formal application letter from the owners of the buildings to the city clerk was sent December 30th 2007 for a change of designation of the entire Grain Exchange Building from a grade II to grade III listing. The application was later rescinded and an application was sent for the Annex to be placed on the inventory to be evaluated as a separate building so as to retain the Grade II designation of the more significant building. The owners inquired into the removal of the Annex from the BCL in order to develop the site.

On January 12th 2009 the owners notified the Planning, Property and Development Department that they had a parkade proposal for the annex site and wished to reapply for a demo permit.

Currently they have 122 stalls but the parkade would allow for a minimum of 275 stalls to exist and allow the building to remain viable.They believe that the proposed parkade will contribute to the ongoing vitality of the Exchange District National Historic Site. They are planning on finishing the development with a historic façade that will positively contribute to the streetscape. The owners have been encouraged by the Winnipeg Parking Authority and the Forks North Portage Partnership to build the parking structure to meet the demands of the downtown parking created by the growth of waterfront drive and the future Human Rights Museum. The structure would be able to access the skywalk system through the Grain Exchange Building is created on the site of the annex.

On January 16th 2009, The Historical Buildings Committee (HBC) recommended that the Grain Exchange Building Annex be placed on the BCL as a grade III with the following character defining elements:

  • South facing office building located at Lombard, adjoining its parent Grain Exchange Building to the west via a second floor bridge.
  • Simple elongated rectangular plan.
  • South elevation with smoothly dressed limestone base with buff brick walls.
  • Ample and grid-like arrangement of fenestration on the east façade.
  • West, east, and north elevations with simple clay brick and modest detailing.[i]

On May 19th 2009, the Lord Selkirk – West Kildonan Community Committee disagreed with the HBC’s recommendation of placing the Annex on the (BCL) as a grade III listing.

On July 13th 2009 the Standing Policy Committee (SPC) on Property and Development (P&D) concurred in the recommendation of the Lord Selkirk – West Kildonan Community Committee with the following amendments namely:

  • Grain exchange building annex at 153 Lombard Avenue not be placed on the BCL as a grade III.
  • That no demo permits be issued for 153 Lombard Avenue prior to the issuance of building permits.
  • That the construction of the proposed development shall be in conformance with the renderings submitted to the SPL on P&D.
  • That the proper officers of the city be authorized to do all things necessary to implement the intent of the foregoing.[ii]

Ray Wan of Ray Wan Architects Inc. submitted two computer-generated images of the proposed development.

On July 15th 2009, the Executive Policy Committee (EPC) agreed with the SPC of P&D and the Lord Selkirk-West Kildonan CC to not add the Annex to the BCL.

On July 22nd 2009, City Council voted 9-6 in opposition of adding the Annex to the BCL, concurring with the EPC, the SPC on P&D and the Lord Selkirk – West Kildonan CC. Council adopted the SPC’s recommendations.



[i]Council Minutes on the Standing Policy Committee Report on Property and Development (July 13th)
[ii]
Council Minutes on the Standing Policy Committee Report on Property and Development (July 13th)
 


Sport Manitoba



In 1882, James Robertson and Co. commissioned a warehouse on the north side of Pacific Ave. between Main and Martha streets. In 1884 Robertson and his company’s local manager commissioned English immigrant and prominent Architect Charles H. Wheeler to design another building further east on Alexander. Wheeler hired Thomas Kelly as the contractor. Robertson leased the building to George Duncan Wood and Company.

George Duncan Wood relocated prior to 1900 and John Dyck Ltd. moved in.

The SmartBag company of Montreal bought John Dyck out in 1906, purchased the property from James Robertson and proceeded to hire Daniel Smith to design the second section of the building. In 1913 the SmartBag Co. merged with Woods Manufacturing Co. and became Smart-Woods Ltd. Due to the mergence of the two respected businesses, more room was needed and the third section was commissioned through John Woodman and Raymond Carey Architects. Many other tenants have resided in the SmartBag Co. building (as it is most commonly known) throughout the years. Prosperity Knitwear was the owner prior to its purchase by Sport Manitoba.

Section A was originally built as a two-storey structure using the mill construction method (solid brick walls, square timber beams and post interior support system and wooden plank floors). A third floor was added prior to 1900. The same method of construction was used on Section B in 1906. The largest and final section was built using reinforced concrete, the latest in technology at the time. This 5-storey building’s facades face three prominent thoroughfares (Lily St., Alexander Ave. and Pacific Ave.) and as a result the building is seen as defining those intersections and being an important contribution to the historic streetscapes.

Due to its three-decade construction period, the complex has ties to three important periods in Winnipeg’s growth including the real estate boom of the early 1880’s, the turn of the century growth phase and the period prior to the First World War when the city was at its growth pinnacle.

The oldest portion of the complex was one of the 22 oldest buildings in the Downtown and one of the eight oldest warehouses. It was seen as a rare, handsome and one of the most intact early examples of the Romanesque Revival Style.[i] The characteristics of the Romanesque Revival Style are:

  • solid brick with a raised stone basement

  • rusticated stone accenting around windows and doors and at roof level

  • use of the arch above the windows and doors

The larger building was built in 1913 and is a simpler, more modern rendition of the Romanesque Revival style with a limestone base, arched windows and brick exterior walls with stone accenting around windows and doors.

The Historical Buildings Committee recommended that the building be listed as a Grade II on December 11 2008. Along with Heritage Winnipeg, the HBC wanted a designation of grade II for “a more vigorous form of protection that is difficult to repeal” but decided to “support the less restrictive heritage designation to allow Sport Manitoba to amend its plans for the athletic centre, which could fill a recreational void in the inner city” [ii]

On January 6th 2009, The SmartBag Company Building was placed on the HBC Conservation list as a grade III building. Including the character-defining elements:

Section A and B (built 1884 and 1906)
                     Exterior
                 o     
3 masonry walls (North, South and West) of the north facing structure
                 o     
metal decorative cornice of the main façade
                 o     
paired and arched second and third stody windows with continuous stone sllls and brick accenting
                 o     
other main façade details including pilasters with decorative metal caps and decorative brick panels
                 o     
railway track lintels on the ground floor windows and the original windows on the third floor of the west façade
                   
              Interior

                 o     
Structural elements (wood beams and posts) and wood 2nd and 3rd floors

             Section C (built 1913) (all elements pertain to north, south and east elevation
             Exterior

                  o     
Reinforced concrete facade
                  o     
Rusticated stone-clad base and dark brick upper floor cladding with stone accenting
                  o     
Stone belt course above the forth floor windows and the stone capping
                  o     
Original industrial sash windwons on all levels including raised, square-headed basement opening, large ground floor elements and arched fourth floor windows with stone keystones
                  o     
Main entrances (two on north and one on south) featuring bull’s eye windows above doors recessed in rusticated and smooth-cut ashlar, prominent surround and keystones
                  o     
Deeply recessed square-headed loading bays on the south façade
                    
            
Interior
                  o     
Columns with mushroom capitals at all levels.[iii]

 

In June 2009, the HBC approved the first phase of the rehabilitation to section C and approved the partial demolition of section A and B to make room for the field house on the condition that the northern façade be retained and integrated into the new development.[iv]

On October 15th 2009, “an independent Engineer’s report deemed [the entire structure including the north façade] structurally unsound”. “After significant deliberation and consideration of various options the HBC amended the existing Certificate of Suitability to appove-in-principle the complete demolition of [the 3 story building] upon submission of the development proposal”[v] and on condition that the site would not be used as surface parking while vacant.

On February 2nd 2010, issued a statement that “they hope[d] to move forward with plans to build a $15-million field house on [the site of] a three-storey component of the Smart Bag building”[vi].

Due to the designation as grade III rather than the recommended grade II, a partial demolition was allowed. The Fire Department considered all three sections as one building therefore the demolition was seen only as a partial and under grade III designation was not required to go to Property and Development. Sport Manitoba was given approval to demolish sections A and B no longer needing to retain the more ornamentally complex north façade as was part of the previous compromise.

Feb 18th 2010 HBC supported the demolition based on proof of significant structural compromise to the structure, thorough review alternatives, and support demonstrated for the proposed interim/future use of the site by the applicant”. The proposed second phase of the renovations is building a multimillion-dollar field house that includes educational, therapeutic and recreational components in the location of the original two sections of the building.

June 2010 sections A and B were demolished. Construction of the field house is in the beginning stages.


[i] Heritage Planners Report December 2008

[ii] (2009, January 7. Kives, B. Sport Manitoba to revisit inner-city field house plan. Winnipeg Free Press).

[iii] Council Minutes Jan 28th 2009, City Clerks Department

[iv] City of Winnipeg Briefing note. February 19, 2010. (1)

[v]City of Winnipeg Briefing note. February 19, 2010. (1)

[vi] 2010, February 2. Kives, B. Sport Manitoba revisits field house. Winnipeg Free Press

 

December 2008. 145 Pacific Avenue SmartBag Company (George Duncan Wood and Co. Building). City of Winnipeg Historical Buildings Committee Report.



The Ryan Block

Update August 2013: The Ryan Block was awarded a 'Preservation Award of Excellence" for commercial conservation in 2012. To see a list of all 2012 award recipients, click here

August, 16, 2010

         

The Ryan Block located across the street from Old Market Square was built for one of Winnipeg’s original shoe merchants, city alderman and mayor, Thomas Ryan in 1895. An addition was built in 1903 but ultimately Ryan relocated to a larger building in 1907.

Bedford Investments acquired the property in 1987 and by 1988 they owned all of the properties lining King Street between Bannatyne and McDermot Avenues excluding a one-story building located at 98 King. This property was acquired and demolished by Bedford Investments despite it being on the Historical Buildings Committee’s “inventory”.

The Historical Buildings Committee (HBC) recommended that the Ryan Block at 104 King be put on the Building Conservation List in order for redevelopment discussions to occur at Council level. It was designated historic Grade II on March 11, 1991. Five months later, a massive fire roared through the 3rd and 4th floors causing $250,000 damage. Arson was suspected.

In 1991 The Winnipeg Core Area Initiative agreed to provide the current owners $750,000 in grant money for redevelopment, however no proposal was ever submitted and the monies were redistributed.

The owner (Reiss of Bedford Investments) applied to have the building de-listed in 1992.

On May 16, 2002 The HBC reviewed an engineering report, paid for by the City and CentreVenture, which confirmed the building required some stabilization work but otherwise was structurally sound.

On September 7, 2004 The Standing Policy Committee of the Planning, Property and Development Department (PPD) reviewed another application by Reiss to de-list. The HBC recommended that the building not be de-listed as no change in its architectural or historical significance occurred. The HBC went on to state that this property is one of the key sites within the National Historic Site. City council agreed with the HBC.

“On April 26, 2005 the Reiss was served with an Order under the Vacant and Derelict Buildings By-law No. 35/2004.”

The City of Winnipeg received a copy of the Final Report prepared for Bedford Investments entitiled: “King and Bannatyne Redevelopment Feasability Study” on August 29, 2006. This report formed the basis of a potential public private partnership between the Public Service and CentreVenture in early 2007.

Reiss provided an engineering report on May 28, 2007 done by Wolfrom Engineering Ltd. Stating that the building should be demolished by winter to prevent potential danger to the public.

On June 1st 2007, a second Order was issued to repair all interior and exterior structural components to bring the building into a safe and stable condition, or to demolish the building. On June 4th 2007, Reiss made an application to de-list with intent to demolish.

On June 6th 2007, an engineer’s report from Crosier Kilgour and Partners Ltd. commissioned by the PP&D reported that “collapse is highly possible” and it is unlikely restorable. The report recommended that the building be demolished but stated that the façade was salvageable. On June 20th 2007 City Council agreed with these recommendations. “[Council] adopted the following:

  • That the King Building, 104 King Street, not be removed from the HBC’s list as the heritage values have not changed.
  • That the listing of the King Building be changed to Grade III designation to accommodate the intention of, at a minimum, preserving the two significant facades facing King Street and Bannatyne Avenue as part of a redevelopment of the site.
  • That proper Officers of the city be authorized to do all things necessary to implement the intent of foregoing.”

“[In 2007 Reiss] agreed to a proposed redevelopment of the site [that would see the following objectives implemented]:

  • Preserving the two principle facades
  • Develop a significant ground floor retail space with frontage along King Street and Bannatyne Avenue.
  • Provide as much parking as practical. Given the limited area of the site, approximately 186 parking stalls are envisioned.
  • Limit the height of the proposed building to that of the existing King building to retain its historical integrity.”

Bedford Investments commissioned an architectural design of a mixed-use development that remains sympathetic to the contrast between the historic masonry buildings at the north and south of the property and a semitransparent metal and glass building between. A feasibility study for the development estimated the cost at around $7 million.

“The City’s financial participation of this proposed redevelopment will assist in enhancing the value of the Exchange District as a National Historic Site by retaining and preserving the historic building facades. The at-grade commercial development will contribute to the revitalization of a special character area and the new public parking structure will replace the open undeveloped parking lot thereby maximizing densification while providing an attractive and desirable pedestrian edge. The additional public parking will also support downtown housing in the immediate area and may lever additional private investment” (10).

Source: Winnipeg City Council Minutes December 19th, 2007

The Ryan Block building was destroyed and converted into a parkade that opened in 2010. For more information, please consult the following articles:

For The Winnipeg Free Press Article written by Bartley Kives on October 21st Click Here
For The Winnipeg Free Press Article written by Bartley Kives on October 22nd Click Here
For The Winnipeg Free Press Article written by Staff Writer on October 22nd Click Here



Hydro Substation

Hydro has found a new location for its substation. They have abandoned and moved on from last years plan that would have seen a block of significant heritage building on McDermot Ave. gutted. Hydro has now decided to build on an old William Ave. surface parking lot that they rented to the Health Sciences Centre prior to the completion of the Tecumseh Parkade.

For the Winnipeg Free Press article click here



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